ABOUT THUNDERHANDS



About Me: "Wakiya" (Thunder)
I am a Tribal, Musician, Writer, Artist. I try to walk the path and have studied the tradition of the "Wisdom keepers" like Lame Deer, Fools Crow, Black Elk, and Rolling Thunder from the tribes of this region, and Lao Tzu, Buddha, Bodhidharma, Yeshua, and other enlightened ones from the many various tribes of the earth. I understand the worlds religions and belief systems, and realize the division this can cause by the lack of understanding the "real message" from the Masters. My intention, and life's prayer is to try to live in harmony with Grandmother Earth, Grandfather sky, (Nature) and "the spirit that moves in all things," and help in any way I can to build a bridge between all men and tribes so they can walk their path in a manner that will benefit themselves, the Earth and others. I open up, and ask Great Spirit, The creator, The Tao, The Universe, to work and direct healing and positive energy through me by different means, like the Flute, drums, Words, Prayer, and Touch. I try to be loving and accept others from the heart, and practice forgiveness. I honor all people, the winged one's, and four legged ones considering us all equal, not one being above another. I honor the bountiful Harvest from Mother earth in the form of plant life, water, air and herbs which sustain our oneness with her. I pray all tribes should re-unite as one, so we may protect the planet and live in harmony. Within you, without you.

Mitakuye Oyasin
( all my relations)
Wakiya

Friday

Lozen / Woman Apache warrior, Shaman, & sage



Lozen was a Chihenne-Chiricahua Apache warrior, shaman, and sage, or seer. She was born in the 1840s ECD*, in a section of New Mexico/Arizona/Northern Mexico known at that time as Apacheria, within sight of the Sacred Mountain near Ojo Caliente where the People began. Some reports place her birth in the late 1840s.

Lozen let it be known at a very early age that she had no interest in learning the duties of wife and mother, and set out on the warrior's path with her brother, who looked up to her. He was the Chihenne-Chiricahua Apache chief, Bidu-ya (also known as Beduiat; European name: Victorio).

At a ceremony at the time of her adolescence, Lozen was given the power to find the enemy which she did by going alone to a deserted spot, standing with her arms outstretched, her open palms facing skyward. She stood waiting, turning slowly until she felt a tingling in her palms. After this spiritual-physical experience, she knew that she had found the direction of the enemy. She could tell the distance of the enemy by the intensity of the tingling. She was legendary for such powers, Diya and Inda-ce-ho-ndi (or "Enemies-Against-Power"), in battle.

She was not the lone woman warrior in her band. She had a companion, Dahteste. Both women fought alongside Geronimo. Lozen did not appear, in photographs, as a woman among men. As is evidenced in several famous photos with fellow warrior Geronimo, there is nothing to indicate that she chose a more traditional Chihenne-Chiricahua woman's appearance: she dressed, lived, and fought as her fellow warriors did. She never married, devoting her life to fighting for her people's survival.

In addition to her considerable skill as a warrior, Lozen was also a skilled reconnaissance scout and clever battle strategist. She took part in warriors' ceremonies, sang war songs, and directed the dances of the war parties before going into battle.

Lozen was a person of many talents, on and off the battlefield. She was also a gifted seer and shaman. Her guidance was sought by many far and wide, and her advice to them was always true. It was while performing her duties as a medicine woman for a Mescalero woman in childbirth that she was not able to perform her usual rituals prior to her band going into battle. Because they did not know the enemy's whereabouts, the band was ambushed, and her brother was killed. Many of her people believed that such a tragedy would not have befallen them had Lozen been available, among them, for guidance.

Lozen and Dahteste, with Geronimo, were eventually taken as prisoners by the white male military; the whole of the U.S. government's military was a blood-thirsty and savage band of what would now be termed "illegal aliens", invading foreigners, and terrorists. She was taken to the prison in the U.S. territory termed Florida (named by the Spanish conqueror, Juan Ponce de León). She was later transported to Mount Vernon Barracks in the U.S. region called Alabama, a Muskogean Indian word. Lozen died there, presumably of tuberculosis, at the approximate age of 50.

Her brother, Bidu-ya, is quoted to have said that "Lozen is my right hand... strong as a man, braver than most, and cunning in strategy. Lozen is a shield to her people."

5 comments:

alc said...

very much enjoyed your histroy of a woamn warrior amongst the native american tribes.

One said...

Great information on Lozen, Apache Warrior! Many are not aware of this incredible woman warrior. Very informative and enlightening! Da nzho, OnePaw

Gustav said...

So much power embodied in a warrior. What a wonderful lesson to share at a time like this... I am inspired and feel her strength.

Serenity said...

thanks and praise for sharing this beautiful and connective tale of the woman warrior Lozen! may her spirit and message live among us!

danger said...

Thanks for posting this needed info. Blessings to us all!